Qt Patches: QGraphicsView & QImageWriter

posted by Andy Maloney

QGraphicsView

Two and a half years ago I wrote about a UX bug with QGraphicsView where it would reset the selection in the view if you tried to extend it with a rubberband selection. I have been using those changes in the version of Qt I maintain for my software.

I finally took the time to figure out how to use the gerrit code review system for submitting patches to the Qt project, and worked with several other developers to get it in shape for merging into the codebase for Qt 5.5.

Qt Library

Qt Library

The way I implemented the changes in my old post was inelegant but functional, so I cleaned it up for submission. Then, based on suggestions from Andreas Hanssen, Dominik Haumann, and Thorbjørn Martsum, took it to the next level to make it elegant. I was even forced to add tests before it would be accepted! <gasp> (Thanks again guys!)

The changes will appear in Qt 5.5, but they will not be backported to Qt4. I have, however, created patches for both if you need to use them:

Qt4 Patch: QGraphicsView_Rubberband_Select_Qt4_patch.diff

Qt5 Patch: QGraphicsView_Rubberband_Select_Qt5_patch.diff


QImageWriter

I also revisited my patch from three years ago for QImageWriter which added the ability to turn on the optimize and progressive scan switches for writing JPEGs, which I also was maintaining in my own version of Qt.

This work had input from another developer, Gunnar Sletta, and became a better commit because of it (thanks Gunnar!).

These changes will also be part of Qt 5.5 and won’t be backported to Qt4. I have created patches for both Qt4 and Qt5 if you need them:

Qt4 Patch: QImageWriter_Qt4_patch.diff

Qt5 Patch: QImageWriter_Qt5_patch.diff


I hope these changes and patches are useful to someone out there. Based on this positive experience I hope to contribute more small changes I have lying around somewhere…

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I’ve known for a while that the interactive map of the world showing some of my bloodstain pattern analysis software customers was kind of slow. I also knew that I was using a very outdated version of Google’s API for displaying the data. Yesterday I decided to take a look at it to see what I needed to do to fix it up.

Old Google Map

Old Google Map

My first stop was the Google page about moving to v3 of the API. Apparently I needed to get a new API key by signing up for something with my Google Account. Google has added usage limits and now tracks absolutely everything (yes, they probably did before, but now it’s more explicit). I also needed to consider whether or not I can use the maps on a commercial site.

I don’t like hurdles, and I like simplicity, so I decided to look around for alternatives. I remembered looking at OpenStreetMap (OSM) several years ago when I originally built my map and deciding it wasn’t quite good enough. I decided to check it out again to see how they were doing. My how things change!

OpenStreetMap

OpenStreetMap

Because I’m a good lazy developer (by that I mean I avoid writing things when they already exist, are well-coded, and maintainable), my first thought was to grab a WordPress plugin and to use it for my map. I tried out the OSM – OpenStreetMap plugin. While it sort-of worked for what I was trying to do, it was not as customizable as I’d like, it seemed too heavy for one map on one site, and it tied me to WordPress (which my other site hasn’t moved to yet).

My next thought was to look for a JavaScript library with a nice API to integrate and handle most of the heavy lifting. Poking around the OSM site, I ran across OpenLayers. It looked pretty powerful, and has a ton of stuff in its API. I downloaded it (10M?) and took a look but I really just wanted something simpler. Then I found Leaflet. Exactly what I needed. Small, simple, great documentation, and some really straightforward examples.

Leaflet

Leaflet

Even though I had to brush up on some JavaScript, jQuery, and JSON concepts—things I rarely use— I ended up researching possibilities and replacing my Google Map with an OpenStreetMap/Leaflet version in just a couple of hours. It’s now much faster and simpler to customize.

New OpenStreetMap/Leaflet Map

New OpenStreetMap/Leaflet Map

In this article, I’ll step through an example that shows how to:

  • set up a simple map using the Leaflet JavaScript library
  • load marker locations from a JSON file
  • change the marker icon
  • have the markers show some data when clicked

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Converting Between cv::Mat and QImage or QPixmap

posted by Andy Maloney

In a previous article, I outlined how to compile OpenCV for Mac OS X and to build and run a small example. In that post I used OpenCV‘s High-Level GUI (highgui) module to display a simple interface using the Qt framework. This is great if you’re writing a one-off program or are just experimenting with OpenCV, but how do you interface with your own Qt-based project if you don’t want to (or can’t) use the highgui module?

OpenCV Library

OpenCV Library

+

Qt Library

Qt Library

The first hurdle is converting between data formats so you can work with images in both OpenCV and Qt. So how do you move an image’s data between a cv::Mat and a QImage or QPixmap so you can display it in a widget?

In this article, I present some functions to handle these conversions and explain how to use them.

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Packaging a Mac OS X Application Using a DMG

posted by Andy Maloney

I learned early on in my software career that packaging up a release of an application can be a real pain. Not only is it time consuming, but it is quite easy to forget a file or miss something when there are so many steps involved and you have to do it frequently. The solution to this is to automate the process. Putting together scripts to package up a release helps avoid missing steps and speeds up development and deployment of releases and updates.

One of the challenges of automating this on Mac OS X is figuring out how to script the creation of Apple disk image (DMG) files. Getting the arguments to hdiutil correct can be quite a challenge! In this post, I’ll give an example of a script I use to do the following:

  • Copy all the necessary files to a staging area
  • Strip and compress the executable files and libraries
  • Create a DMG of the correct size for the release
  • Add a link to /Applications to the DMG
  • Add a background to the DMG so when it opens up your company logo or application graphic appears
  • Check the background image’s DPI to ensure it is 72. Fix it if it’s not.
  • Resize the window and icons, and position items in the DMG so when it opens everything is in the right place
  • Create a final, compressed DMG

Packaging An Application Using a DMG

Packaging An Application Using a DMG

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Clean Up Your LinkedIn Page

posted by Andy Maloney

Over the years, LinkedIn has been adding “content” to the data feed and to the right-hand side of the home page which cannot be turned off in the preferences – things like Jobs You May Be Interested In (I’m not) and Companies You May Want To Follow (I don’t). The worst of these is the LinkedIn Today blob at the top of the updates.

LinkedIn Today Blob

LinkedIn Today Blob

When it initially showed up, I put in a ticket asking how to turn it off and was told that they were working on it. Six months later I hadn’t heard back, so I asked again (and again) and they have now informed me that it’s permanent.

Well I’ve decided to make it unpermanent by hiding all these spammy bits with Adblock Plus. (If you are not surfing with an ad blocker, you should. Adblock Plus is simple to install and it will enhance your browsing experience and your life in general.)

LinkedIn Today - Kill It With Fire!

Here’s how to do it…

Update 07 May 2012: Added instructions to remove Sponsored Content
Update 18 July 2014: Added instructions to remove LinkedIn Pulse

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Compiling OpenCV On Mac OS X 10.6

posted by Andy Maloney

A couple of years ago I needed to do some basic image processing and found OpenCV. OpenCV is a BSD-licensed library for digital image processing which implements several hundred computer vision algorithms. Unfortunately compiling it on the Mac was not straightforward—requiring Fink or MacPorts—and the one existing Mac framework was out of date and no longer maintained.

OpenCV Library

OpenCV Library

Fast forward to last week. I had another requirement for some image processing magic and I thought I’d check out OpenCV again. What a difference! It’s now really easy to compile and use on the Mac. I didn’t find a writeup online on how to compile on the Mac—the one on the OpenCV site is out of date—so I thought I’d write up a short summary for future reference and any Googlers out there in internet land.

Here’s how I did it…

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Extending Selections In QGraphicsView

posted by Andy Maloney

Overall, the Qt library has done a fantastic job of maintaining relatively simple interfaces with well-named functions that do what they say they’re going to do [unlike MFC for example] and of having objects react the way you would expect them to without much modification. I’ve used it for several cross-platform Windows/Mac OS X/Linux applications and I can usually bend it to my will fairly easily because they’ve provided the right hooks.

One exception I’ve run into recently – and an oversight that is really kind of surprising – is using rubber band selections on a QGraphicsView. What would be natural – and what most people would expect – is that if the user is holding down the “modify selection” key – Control on Windows, Command on Mac OS X – then:

  • clicking a selected object will deselect it without modifying the rest of the selection
  • clicking an unselected object will select it without modifying the rest of the selection
  • clicking and dragging will give the user a way to select several objects to add to the current selection (known as rubber band or drag selection).

QGraphicsView With Selection

QGraphicsView With Objects Selected In Red

But with QGraphicsView – by design – if you have some objects selected (as pictured above), there’s no way to extend the selection by using “rubber band selection” to add to it. Clicking the mouse clears the current selection regardless of whether the user is holding the “modify selection” key. This is a UX design bug. It is counter-intuitive and confusing for users.

QGraphicsView Selection Method

QGraphicsView Selection Method - Holding Down The Control/Command Key Resets Selection

Not only is the default behaviour confusing, there’s no way to correct it without either inheriting from QGraphicsView and writing a new rubber band selection system or hacking the Qt source. I chose to fix the problem by doing the latter. Fortunately this turned out to be easier than I originally thought it would be…

(19 Jan 2015): I submitted a patch for this which has been merged into the Qt codebase. This fix will be part of Qt 5.5.

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